Funding

Schools and districts use a variety of funding sources toward their purchase of the Children’s Progress Academic Assessment (CPAA). Some common sources may already be in your budget. See examples below. Note that some schools have also applied for and received grants to support their use of the CPAA.

In addition to local funds, the following can be used nationwide:

Title I – A Improving Basic Programs
Title I – C Migrant Children
Title II – A Improving Teacher Quality
Title II – D Enhancing Education through Technology
Title III Language Acquisition
Title VI-B Rural Education
Title VII Indian Education
IDEA Special Education

The list below summarizes how the CPAA meets the requirements of each federal program. Clicking on any funding source will take you to the relevant United States Department of Education page for more information. You can also download this funding chart as a PDF.

Title I – A


Improving Basic Programs

Allocation is based on # or % of students living in poverty.

What does it fund?
Additional learning opportunities to help low-achieving children master curricula and meet standards in core subjects (e.g., supplemental reading & math instruction, school improvement programs, targeted assistance, preschool, after-school & summer programs to extend & reinforce curriculum)

Does the CPAA meet requirements?
  • YES. As an adaptive assessment, the CPAA adjusts to individual needs to help ALL students move toward meeting rigorous state standards.
  • The CPAA helps drive individual & district-wide improvement by providing instant reports that pinpoint areas of difficulty and make detailed instructional recommendations.
  • Instant reports contain key data for tracking AYP for students and groups (including any custom demographic groups).
  • Parent reports in English and Spanish include performance summaries and suggested activities that empower families to help drive student achievement.

Title I – C


Migrant Children

Allocation is based on # of eligible migrant children

What does it fund?
Additional learning opportunities to help identify and address the educational needs of migrant children (e.g. instructional resources, remedial and compensatory instruction, bilingual resources and preschool services)

Does the CPAA meet requirements?
  • YES. The CPAA can be used as an efficient universal screener for migrant children as it is available in English and Spanish and can be administered in the fall or throughout the school year. The CPAA’s instant reports provide detailed information to help educators make immediate placement decisions and get a head start on identifying migrant students’ instructional needs.

Title II – A


Improving Teacher Quality

Allocation is based on # of
students eligible for free & reduced lunch

What does it fund?
Standards-aligned training and related scientifically-based materials that will enhance teacher quality and improve student academic achievement

Does the CPAA meet requirements?
  • YES. CPAA training sessions (in-service or web based) can be supported with this source. These sessions help all teachers and administrators effectively use the CPAA to bring the greatest learning gains to each child and take timely next steps to differentiate instruction.
  • Additionally, these training sessions help teachers become more effective at using formative assessment in their classroom and proactively preparing students to meet standards before the high-stakes testing begin.

Title II – D


Enhancing Education Through Technology

50% distributed by formula based on # of children in poverty; 50% distributed by competition

What does it fund?
Instructional systems, software, computer equipment and high quality professional development and training that will guide educators in making the most of technology resources

Does the CPAA meet requirements?
  • YES. As a computer-administered assessment, the CPAA is a perfect fit for this source.
  • Optional CPAA training sessions can also be funded by this title as they are a means of ensuring best practice use of this technology).

Title III


Language Acquisition

Allocation is based on # of ELLs
& students eligible for free & reduced lunch

What does it fund?
High-quality instructional resources and programs to increase the academic achievement and English-language proficiency of Limited English Proficient (LEP) students

Does the CPAA meet requirements?
  • YES. Available in English & Spanish, the CPAA quickly identifies the academic needs of Spanish-speaking English language learners and distinguishes academic performance from language acquisition issues. This information helps inform accurate placement and instruction of ELLs and has been shown to reduce misidentification for special education services by more than 50%.

Title VI-B


Rural Education

Allocation is based on rural location, school size & # of
students eligible for free & reduced lunch

What does it fund?
Resources and programs that help create instructional equity in reading and math for small, rural schools (e.g. professional development, technology that meets Title II-D requirements, parental involvement activities, or activities authorized under Title III)

Does the CPAA meet requirements?
  • YES. As a tool that meets Title II-D and Title III requirements, the CPAA can be supported with this funding source in rural areas.
  • Moreover, the CPAA can be funded as a resource that helps promote parental involvement since it contains built-in parent reports with a summary of performance and suggestions for home activities.

Title VII


Indian Education

Allocation is based on # of eligible
American Indian students

What does it fund?
Resources and programs that help create instructional equity for students of Native American descent (e.g. early childhood & family programs, bilingual programs, enrichment programs that support the attainment of state academic standards)

Does the CPAA meet requirements?
  • YES. The adaptive format of the CPAA ensures that it is sensitive to student performance and can be used with a broad range of students. The CPAA can be used as a universal screening tool with eligible students to ensure that they are on track for meeting challenging state standards before high stakes testing begins.

IDEA


Special Education

Allocation is based on # of students with learning disabilities

What does it fund?
Resources that will help provide free appropriate public education (FAPE) to children with disabilities (e.g. early intervention, staff, training, instructional resources that will help improve achievement on state tests); up to 15% of funds can be used for intervention services for students who have not been identified as needing special education but who need additional support to succeed in a general education environment

Does the CPAA meet requirements?
  • YES. The CPAA can be used as a universal screener for the general population and a follow-up assessment for students who require more frequent progress monitoring and interventions. The CPAA’s adaptive format ensures that it is appropriate for general and special education.
  • The CPAA’s recommended activities (automatically generated based on student performance in each academic concept) can act as helpful thought-starters for interventions.
Funding Tips
  • Check your state department of education website for grant opportunities in the following focus areas: early learning, special education, technology and parent involvement.
  • For grant writing tips and links, see this comprehensive resource from Education World: Tips & Resources for Successful Grant Writing.

Request a demo to discuss your funding options and learn more about the CPAA.